Blog Archives

We’re Working with You to Battle Cyber Crime

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Since 2013, cyber criminals have attacked over 22,000 businesses via business email scams with losses totaling over $3.1 billion. Businesses of any size are vulnerable. Experts estimate that 80% of cyber attacks are avoidable through basic cyber hygiene.  By implementing a variety of safety and prevention measures, you can significantly reduce the chances of your business suffering losses due to cyber crime.

To help businesses understand the risks and the ways they can help protect themselves from this growing threat, we recently sponsored a cyber security seminar at Arizona Small Business Association’s Friday, Sept. 30 meeting. We want to share a few of the key takeaways from our panel of experts in law enforcement, information security and insurance. Here’s what we learned from Howard Miller, CRM, CIC, of L/B/W Insurance and Financial Services, and Chuck Matthews and Robert Meshinsky of WGM Associates.

  • Employee training throughout your organization is critical. Make sure you have clear policies about cyber security and that they are clearly communicated to your staff, contractors and anyone else who has the ability to expose your company to risk. Educate all of your employees about the risks of clicking on links in emails and sharing business information via phone or email with people they don’t know or trust.
  • Limit access to software to employees who really need it and make sure that each employee has their own log-in (don’t have employees share log-ins) so you can track activity back to a specific person.
  • Keep software updated regularly. Cyber thieves exploit vulnerabilities in older versions of software.
  • Use two-factor authentication to access your internet email and other sensitive applications such as online banking. Two-factor authentication requires you to use a one-time password in addition to your regular password, making it more difficult for hackers to hack.
  • Make sure your back-up files are capturing all of your critical data and that your employees are following your prescribed protocol for backing up their files. Also make sure you are backing up your files in a different physical location so you can use them in the event of a natural disaster.
  • Look at your third party vendor contracts to understand what cyber risk you might assume through your relationship with that vendor, particularly with cloud providers who typically accept little, if any, liability associated with cyber crime.
  • Take information security as seriously as operations and finance.
  • Create a VPN (virtual private network) to secure communications to your business network that are initiated by authorized employees using devices outside of your network.
  • Secure your wi-fi with a password and encryption.
  • Use different passwords for different sites and make them long and complex.
  • Check any existing cyber security insurance you may have to look for gaps or exclusions in the coverage. Business interruption is typically limited to physical causes so most insurance won’t cover business interruption due to a cyber attack.
  • Before your business is targeted by cyber criminals, establish a relationship with your local FBI office. They’re the lead federal agency for investigating these kinds of attacks.

For banking (online as well as offline), the following recommendations were made:

  • Use dual control for all ACH and wire transfers. Dual control means that another person or account has to authorize a transfer in addition to the person who initiates it.
  • Never trust wire instructions or other funds transfer instructions sent via email. Always call the person or company to verify the instructions.
  • Set up alerts that automatically notify you about log-ins, password changes, transfers, etc. This way if an unauthorized change is made, you know and can respond quickly.
  • Use Trusteer Rapport software (available free) to provide a secure web channel between your computer and the bank’s online banking site.
  • Use our ACH Fraud Protection Service, which enables business clients to review ACH transactions before they are complete and to choose to pay or return each item.
  • Use ACH blocks or restrictions, if you know you won’t be using these electronic payments, or if you want to limit ACH withdrawals to only specific vendors.

To address the risks of funds transfer fraud and cyber deception, our bank has also introduced a new way for our business banking clients to protect themselves through a first-of-its-kind cyber insurance group policy. The policy provides gap insurance, since most cyber crime insurance policies don’t cover losses for money sent out of a business banking account “voluntarily;” that is, when someone in your firm is tricked into sending funds to a cyber criminal posing as a trusted colleague or vendor. For more information on this policy, please visit grandpointinsurance.com.

Insurance Products are:
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Insurance Products are offered through Grandpoint Insurance Services, Inc., a non-bank insurance agency affiliate of Grandpoint Bank, and facilitated through LBW Insurance & Financial Services, Inc., an unaffiliated insurance agency.

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Help Protect Your Business: Important Cyber Security Seminar

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Since 2013, cyber criminals have attacked over 17,000 businesses via business email scams, with losses totaling over $2.3 billion. An estimated 80 percent of businesses are not adequately prepared for a cyber crime attack. Are you?

The Biltmore Bank of Arizona is proud to sponsor a panel discussion addressing this growing threat at Arizona Small Business Association’s Friday, Sept. 30 meeting from 7:00 to 9:30 a.m. at the Arizona Biltmore, located at 2400 E. Missouri Avenue.

We invite you to attend as our guest to learn about emerging cyber crime risks and ways you can help protect your business. You will hear from our panel of experts from the FBI, information security and insurance industries. FBI representatives will include retired agents who served on the 9/11 task force, served as the FBI’s national spokesperson on cyber crime and agents who taught computer forensics at the FBI Academy in Quantico.

At the event, entitled Arizona Speaks: Business & Technology, additional speakers will also be on hand to discuss utilizing equity crowdfunding to raise capital.

Register here by Sept. 23.

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Inside Tucson Business Article – Cyber Insurance: A Necessity in the Digital Age

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Linda Drake

Thank you to article author Linda Drake of Trailblazer Advisors and to Inside Tucson Business for allowing us to republish this article on our blog. Client Cyber Crime Insurance is available to all business customers of Grandpoint Bank and its divisions, The Biltmore Bank of Arizona, Bank of Tucson and Regents Bank.

Read the original article here:
http://www.insidetucsonbusiness.com/business_chatter/cyber-insurance-a-necessity-in-the-digital-age/article_3bbe8650-4f93-11e6-a8b2-8baff37c26c2.html↗

Whether you are a business large or small, old or new, the dangers of a cyber breach are lurking. The truth is that all businesses today are digital in one form or another. It is the age of the Internet of Everything! Cloud computing is the basis of almost all transactions and with every touch of the keyboard or data entry, there is an attached risk of a breach. And with that breach, comes the liability that might not just be disruptive to your business; it could be devastating.

The costs of a breach can be enormous. (Imagine losing a major bank transfer or assuming a loss of $10,000 for each cyber-security infraction.) By the way, your attacker can come from the outside or inside, as 70 percent of breaches are initiated by employees or former employees.

So what this thing called cyber insurance? Cyber insurance arose out of the traditional Errors and Omissions (E&O) coverage known to most businesses. Over time coverage was extended to viruses, data corruption to connected client systems, or damage affecting customers. Generally, early adopters were technology-based companies.

More than a decade ago, network security policies expanded to include breaches of confidential information. At that point, the retail segment adopted cyber insurance on a wide scale.

Coverage for any business could be simple or complex. The determining factor is an employer’s decision on degree of acceptable risk. Let’s take the simple first.

The Bank of Tucson, through Grandpoint Insurance Services, now offers cyber insurance coverage for its customers at a nominal cost. The coverage for business accounts protects against losses for funds transfer fraud (when someone impersonates your company for a funds transfer) and cyber deception (when a criminal pretends to be your vendor employee or client and gets you to transfer money to them). Mike Hannley, president of Bank of Tucson, announced the new product in the last month. Mike commented, “Internet criminals do not use guns for illicit gain, but they gladly use your computer and network for paydays!”

Let’s take a look at broader, more complex cyber insurance. That kind of cyber insurance may have several parts:

Network Security: Your network has failed in some form. It could be that someone is trying to shut down your network to in an effort to stop you from conducting business. Or, you’ve just experienced a data breach, some form of extortion, or tapped your system to advance a virus to all of your connected transmissions.

Privacy: Privacy is huge and does not necessarily have to be connected to a system failure. There are many known cases of information of physical records that are not properly disposed of, including human errors (think of a lost laptop with an easily penetrated passcode) or a hard drive with customer records that somehow got into the wrong hands.

Media Liability:  This aspect covers advertising injury claims like copyright, libel and slander. Coverage may extend to offline content as well.

Digging deeper, network security and privacy liability policies covers first and third party liabilities. First party means the direct costs of responding to a breach; third party means it applies when people sue or make claims against you.

First party inclusions: 

Costs of notifying anyone attached to the breach

Loss of profits and business interruption

Legal advice and regulatory obligations

Public relations expenses

Third party inclusions:

Regulatory fines and penalties

Damage and judgments related to the breach

Legal expenses

Costs of responding to regulatory inquiries

According to Jack Clements, CPA at the Clements Agency, “Every company, large or small, should at least consider cyber Insurance. There are so many examples of exposure to loss that it is difficult to list them all; some exposures are unique to certain types of businesses.”

“And don’t forget about controls; they are critical,” Jack continued. “In broad policies, premiums are based upon the quality of your controls. Many companies believe that their controls are so strong, that it can never happen to them. Believe me, it can and it will.”

Another aspect of this discussion is commonly known as “Social Engineering” or “Duping.” This is a scheme where a seemingly legitimate email is sent to you asking for money or confidential information. It happens all the time. Jack added, “In fact, an attempt was made on our office this week. We received a business email from my brother, with whom we do business, asking for a wire transfer. When we called him, we learned that it was completely fraudulent. Had we complied, the transaction would not have been covered by our Cyber Policy, since we willingly sent the money. We would, however, have been covered by the Social Engineering endorsement that we have on our package policy. Just another area to think about.”

Linda Drake is a 25-year, seasoned global entrepreneur, corporate executive, author and Certified Professional & Executive Coach. 

For more information on the Client Cyber Crime Insurance, visit www.grandpointinsurance.com (California Insurance License #0K82434).

Insurance Products are:
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Insurance Products are offered through Grandpoint Insurance Services, Inc., a non-bank insurance agency affiliate of Grandpoint Bank, and facilitated through LBW Insurance & Financial Services, Inc., an unaffiliated insurance agency.

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↗ Linking to Non-Biltmore Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Biltmore Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Biltmore Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Biltmore Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.

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Treasury Management – Manage and Protect Your Funds More Effectively

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Moving money and executing transactions is easier than ever, but what is your business doing to make sure your funds aren’t at risk? From the most elaborate cyber attacks to a simple unauthorized alteration on a check, you could be vulnerable to all kinds of fraud.

Financial institutions have processes and procedures in place to help protect against fraud. But the increasing risk and sophistication of cyber crimes in particular, both at home and in the office, makes it especially important for everyone to be vigilant and cautious. That’s why The Biltmore Bank of Arizona continually invests in tools and resources to help detect potentially fraudulent transactions and accounts with a high potential for fraud. We believe it is equally important for our clients to understand the risks and be aware of the steps you can take to help protect your business assets. We want to share a few of the practices we follow and the products we offer to help you minimize your vulnerability.

With so many ways that passwords can be compromised – from inadvertent sharing with others to malware that mines your personal information — protecting the secure access to your online accounts is crucial. Ever heard of a keylogger? It’s malware that captures and records a user’s keystrokes. It can be used by a cyber-criminal to record your passwords and a variety of other information. As a deterrent to these kinds of compromises, Biltmore Bank business clients use a secure access code to access their accounts through online banking, and the associated password expires every 90 days. This precaution helps protect against a possible breach if your password falls into the wrong hands.

Most people know that Internet connections can be vulnerable to compromise. Various layers of protection are available, including firewalls, anti-virus software and network encryption, but cyber criminals are always working to try to break through these barriers. That’s why these programs are continuously updated and why keeping current with each new release is so critical. To provide a secure web channel between our client’s computer and the bank’s online banking site, so that no other user can get in the middle, we offer Trusteer Rapport software to our business clients. This free, downloadable software helps to prevent malware and phishing attacks and provides sustainable fraud protection.

One of the most frequent targets for cyber thieves are ACH payments – payments created when you give an originating party authorization to debit directly from your checking or saving account for the purpose of bill payment. To commit ACH fraud, all a cyber thief needs is your account number and the bank routing number, which can be taken directly from an unsuspecting victim’s check. Our ACH Fraud Protection Services enable business clients to review these transactions before they are complete and to choose to pay or return each item, to guard against fraudulent automatic withdrawals. If you know you won’t be using these electronic payments, we can set up an ACH block so that no ACH payments are allowed. Or, if you only expect ACH withdrawals from a handful of vendors, you can restrict your ACH authorization to just those few vendors.

As an added layer of protection, your online banking profile can also be IP address-restricted, meaning if a request to transfer funds from your Phoenix-based company is issued by an IP address located in New York, the transaction will be rejected. Our Risk Fraud Analytics system reviews all of your company’s transactions for other anomalies as well. You also have the option to set a maximum dollar limit for transactions you may initiate. If that limit is exceeded, the transaction will automatically be rejected. In addition, you’ll be alerted if someone changes a password, user entitlements, dollar limits and more. Business clients can also set up dual control on their wires and ACH transactions. This can reduce employee fraud, but it also makes it more difficult for cyber criminals to complete a fraudulent transfer since two people within the business must sign off on these transactions.

One of the most prevalent types of fraud today is cyber deception, which is usually the result of human error – falling victim to complex scams in which criminals pose as a trusted colleague, business associate or vendor in order to gain access to your financial assets. It is particularly hard to detect. These schemes are typically executed via email, but cyber criminals have become increasingly adept at spoofing phones as well. What you believe to be a legitimate request could result in you unwittingly paying a crook. For more on this topic, please refer to the cyber security article from the FBI we republished on our blog.

Of course, fraud schemes aren’t always so sophisticated. If someone has altered a check you’ve issued, you might never notice – until it is too late. A simple safeguard against this kind of theft is our Positive Pay Service. You provide the bank with what is essentially a digital check register and we match it against the checks presented for payment. If we see any discrepancies, we notify you so that you can review and decide whether or not the check should be paid. All checks presented for payment are verified, including checks presented in person at our banking offices.

Businesses with a high volume of checks arriving through the mail are at risk of crooks intercepting these payments. We offer a layer of protection through our Lock Box Service, which streamlines the remittance process. Payments are sent to a secure post office box where they are collected by the bank several times a day and deposited directly into your Biltmore Bank account. The post office box and speedy collection system help minimize the opportunities for the check to be intercepted after it’s placed in the mail. The service also provides timely payment receipt reporting and provides you access to electronic and paper remittance images online to update your receivables or research customer questions.

To discuss how you can layer additional treasury management protections onto your business accounts, contact your Biltmore Bank of Arizona relationship manager or call our office.

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FBI Article: Ransomware on the Rise

We noticed that a lot of you really liked the last FBI cyber security article we ran. We’re pleased the Bureau has encouraged us to share their articles on this topic, so we’re happy to do so again. This article deals with a concerning type of cybercrime called ransomware, where a malware restricts access to the infected computer/network and demands that the operators pay some sort of ransom to regain control of their network. We hope this article is helpful to you. Please let us know if you have information or ideas on this topic that our readers may want to hear.

You can find this article, as well as many other articles you may find valuable to keep your business and staff secure against cybercrime, at this web address:

https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2015/january/ransomware-on-the-rise/ransomware-on-the-rise↗

For more information about fraud protection tools and product features provided by The Biltmore Bank of Arizona, please visit our website.

Ransomware on the Rise
FBI and Partners Working to Combat This Cyber Threat

Your computer screen freezes with a pop-up message—supposedly from the FBI or another federal agency—saying that because you violated some sort of federal law your computer will remain locked until you pay a fine. Or you get a pop-up message telling you that your personal files have been encrypted and you have to pay to get the key needed decrypt them.

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 10.50.23 AMThese scenarios are examples of ransomware scams, which involve a type of malware that infects computers and restricts users’ access to their files or threatens the permanent destruction of their information unless a ransom—anywhere from hundreds to thousands of dollars—is paid.

Ransomware doesn’t just impact home computers.
Businesses, financial institutions, government agencies, academic institutions, and other organizations can and have become infected with it as well, resulting in the loss of sensitive or proprietary information, a disruption to regular operations, financial losses incurred to restore systems and files, and/or potential harm to an organization’s reputation.

Ransomware has been around for several years, but there’s been a definite uptick lately in its use by cyber criminals. And the FBI, along with public and private sector partners, is targeting these offenders and their scams.

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 10.47.22 AMWhen ransomware first hit the scene, computers predominately became infected with it when users opened e-mail attachments that contained the malware.
But more recently, we’re seeing an increasing number of incidents involving so-called “drive-by” ransomware, where users can infect their computers simply by clicking on a compromised website, often lured there by a deceptive e-mail or pop-up window.

Another new trend involves the ransom payment method. While some of the earlier ransomware scams involved having victims pay “ransom” with pre-paid cards, victims are now increasingly asked to pay with Bitcoin, a decentralized virtual currency network that attracts criminals because of the anonymity the system offers.

Also a growing problem is ransomware that locks down mobile phones and demands payments to unlock them.

The FBI and our federal, international, and private sector partners have taken proactive steps to neutralize some of the more significant ransomware scams through law enforcement actions against major botnets↗ that facilitated the distribution and operation of ransomware.

For example:

  • Reveton ransomware, delivered by malware known as Citadel, falsely warned victims that their computers had been identified by the FBI or Department of Justice as being associated with child pornography websites or other illegal online activity. In June 2013, Microsoft, the FBI, and our financial partners disrupted a massive criminal botnet built on the Citadel malware, putting the brakes on Reveton’s distribution. FBI statement↗ and additional details.↗
  • Cryptolocker was a highly sophisticated ransomware that used cryptographic key pairs to encrypt the computer files of its victims and demanded ransom for the encryption key. In June 2014, the FBI announced—in conjunction with the Gameover Zeus botnet disruption—that U.S. and foreign law enforcement officials had seized Cryptolocker command and control servers. The investigation into the criminals behind Cryptolocker continues, but the malware is unable to encrypt any additional computers. Additional details.↗

If you think you’ve been a victim of Cryptolocker, visit the Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT) CryptoLocker webpage↗ for remediation information.

The FBI—along with its federal, international, and private sector partners—will continue to combat ransomware and other cyber threats. If you believe you’ve been the victim of a ransomware scheme or other cyber fraud activity, please report it to the Bureau’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

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↗ Linking to Non-Biltmore Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Biltmore Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Biltmore Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Biltmore Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.

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Biltmore Bank of Arizona Presents:

2016 Real Estate Preview with Michael Orr on October 27

(Plus 10 cyber security tips from Rich Endicott)

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Please join us as Michael Orr,↗ Director of the Real Estate Center at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, talks about the real estate market of the past year and what to expect in 2016.

Michael is considered one of the leading experts on the status of the Arizona residential real estate market. He partnered with Arizona Regional Multiple Listing Service ARMLS and the Information Market LLC in 2008 to create the Cromford Report,↗ which provides daily real estate market insight for realtors and investors covering the Greater Phoenix residential market.

Additionally, The Biltmore Bank of Arizona President Rich Endicott will share practical tips for all business owners on how to improve their network security and protect their businesses from cyber fraud.

This is a must-see presentation for all who own residential and commercial property or a business in our state! Tickets are limited and going fast.

When: Tuesday, October 27, 4:30-7 p.m. (MST)

Where: Arizona Country Club, 5668 E. Orange Blossom Lane, Phoenix, AZ 85018

Cost: Free

Register here.↗

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↗ Linking to Non-Biltmore Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Biltmore Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Biltmore Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Biltmore Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.

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Nine Tips for Better Cyber Security

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Our Increasing dependence on information technology and networks has brought tremendous efficiency to our work and personal lives, but with these efficiencies come risks; particularly risks from cybercrime. According to an October 2014 independent study conducted by Ponemon Institute, the percentage of businesses impacted by malware and other kinds of cyber fraud is up 144 percent, and a survey by Experian↗ found that 60 percent of small businesses that suffer a cyber attack are out of business within one year due to the costs of customer notification, lawsuits, etc. Small and medium-sized businesses can be especially vulnerable since they often do not have the same level of resources as larger companies to defend their information technology systems and track their financial transactions on a frequent or daily basis. While protecting your business against cyber criminals may require a combination of special resources and a change in workplace procedures, here are a few basic steps that you can take at work and at home to reduce your risk of being hacked, spoofed, falling victim to computer viruses and Trojan horses or having your identity stolen.

  1. Keep your computer secure. Install and run anti-virus and anti-spyware and make sure you keep these up to date to protect against new threats. Use the latest versions of Internet browsers, such as Firefox, Google Chrome and Internet Explorer, and make sure your operating system and applications are updated regularly.
  2. Use a separate, dedicated computer for online banking – this decreases your chance of infection with malware because you are unlikely to encounter these programs on trusted banking sites. Do not use this computer for general web browsing and email.
  3. Never share usernames and passwords –use strong passwords with a combination of lower and upper case letters, numbers and symbols, and change your passwords if you suspect they could have been compromised. Use different passwords for the main applications you use. For example, your online banking password should be different than your email password.
  4. Use email safely. Don’t click on links within your email – instead, open your browser and search for the company that supposedly sent the link. Be cautious about opening attachments or downloading files from unfamiliar sources. These files can contain viruses or other software that can jeopardize your computer’s security.
  5. Don’t give out personal information over the phone or via email unless you have initiated the contact. Even if the email looks like it’s coming from someone you know, the person’s email may have been hacked.
  6. Never use unprotected Internet connections – In addition to using only secure connections, make sure websites asking for sensitive information are secure. These websites will show up in your browser with a lock icon in its toolbar that, when clicked, should display an info sheet, including the company’s name. Also, the URL should start with “https” instead of “http.”
  7. Educate your employees, family, housemates or anyone else who has access to your computer network and/or your financial information about cyber security best practices. You should also discuss monitoring account information and billing statements regularly for unauthorized charges and withdrawals.
  8. Do not keep your passwords on your computer in a Word document. While this practice is convenient for cutting and pasting and may protect against key logging software that can grab your keystrokes, this technique leaves the user vulnerable to clipboard loggers that capture the contents of the clipboard. Documents on your computer, even when password protected, are also vulnerable to skilled hackers. A better idea is to use a password manager program – some of which are free. PCMag.com offers an overview of these programs here.↗
  9. Ask your bank what they are doing to assist you in cyber fraud prevention. At The Biltmore Bank of Arizona, our online banking platform offers tools, such as Trusteer Rapport,↗ which works alongside your current security software to add protection and decrease your susceptibility to criminal behavior, protecting you and your business from threats your antivirus cannot. We also offer features like Security and Transaction Alerts that can help clients protect themselves from fraud. Businesses using online banking also have access to security features such as dual control and user limits, along with Treasury Management products like ACH Fraud Protection, Positive Pay, and out-of-band authentication and secure access codes to protect ACH and wire transactions. And, we continually invest in back office resources to help detect potentially fraudulent transactions.

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↗ Linking to Non-Biltmore Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Biltmore Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Biltmore Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Biltmore Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.